Do You Have The ‘Just Get on With It’ Approach?

Do You Have The ‘Just Get on With It’ Approach?

Do You Have The ‘Just Get on With It’ Approach?

There are lots of reasons why some of us tend to ‘bottle things up’ and just ‘get on with it’. The British ‘stiff upper lip’ tendency of remaining unemotional and resolute in the face of difficulties stands strong. While slowly being recognised, male culture is still dominated by messages of needing to be ‘strong’ and ‘unemotional’, as though the two are inherently linked. There remains a stigma attached to expressing and talking about feelings; whether this is a result of pride, a fear of being perceived as weak, or simply feeling uncomfortable disclosing personal experiences. Having said this, there is a balance to be sought; there are times when we need to be able to remain emotionally stable, perhaps at work, or in supporting others. Breaking down in the middle of the office, or demonstrating your overwhelming anxiety in front of your children, may not be optimal either. Regulating our emotional experiences is a functional skill. Many people may have a tendency to keep things to themselves, but that is not to say they are not processing things in their own way or doing what they need to do to get through the day. So where does the balance lie? And are there downsides of ‘bottling things up’ or is this as good a strategy as any?

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Challenging Anxiety Day to Day

Challenging Anxiety Day to Day

Challenging Anxiety Day to Day

Worrying, over-thinking, second guessing constantly….a lot of people will identify with these as features of day to day life. Surprisingly common place, these can be significant drains on our energy, our emotional well-being and our ability to enjoy experiences. For some, these thinking patterns can, over time, edge towards much more significant experiences of anxiety and low mood. Can you think of a time when you’ve convinced yourself out of giving something new a go? Or perhaps a time when you’ve spent the day feeling tense and preoccupied, only to kick yourself later on for ‘worrying for nothing’? Most people can think of a time when they have laid awake at night thinking over something without being able to reach a resolution. So is there a way of tackling some of these experiences?

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The Stress and Pressures of Being a Teenager Today

The Stress and Pressures of Being a Teenager Today

The Stress and Pressures of Being a Teenager Today

Most would agree that teenage years brought with them moments of awkwardness, shyness, social pressures, and at least a few moments of humiliation we would rather forget. But what is it like to go through those challenging years of development for the current generations? With growing pressures of school, social media, societal focus on appearance and an increasingly complicated world to navigate, it is unsurprising that young people now face the highest levels of anxiety, depression, self-harm and hospital admission for mental health difficulties for generations.

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Key Signs of Emotional Difficulties in your Child or Teenager

Key Signs of Emotional Difficulties in your Child or Teenager

Key Signs of Emotional Difficulties in your Child or Teenager

Mental health problems can present a little differently in children and young people. Feelings and tricky behaviours can be short lived. Young people have to face a lot of changes and transitions which can set off anxious, angry, tearful or argumentative states. We know teenagers in particular can be very up and down in their mood and behaviours. Children can seem very different in your company compared to with peers and at school. This is all to be expected. So how do you know when to seek more support?

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Talking About Feelings with your Child

Talking About Feelings with your Child

Talking about feelings and emotions with your children

As a parent, this can be much easier said than done. You might not be used to talking about feelings so openly yourself. You might have tried to protect your child from difficult feelings as far as possible. Some children might squirm and resist efforts to talk about tricky feelings. Sometimes these things can just be really hard to talk about.

Yet we also know how important it can be to support a child’s emotional understanding and expression. Not only does it support their ability to identify, label and make sense of their feelings, it also gives a clear message that it is OK to have different feelings. It teaches children that letting someone know how they are feeling can be helpful; they don’t have to hide away, bottle things up or try to manage things by themselves. For those children who struggle to calm down or manage their mood, supporting their emotional literacy is often the first step towards them developing strategies for staying well-regulated.

So how can you start to introduce these conversations?

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